Local Bowl Games Generate $43.7 Million for San Diego

| Miscellaneous

San Diego’s two post-season college football games combined to produce an economic impact of $43.7 million for the San Diego region in 2005. This figure was the result of a study conducted by the San Diego State University Center for Hospitality and Tourism Research. The games are organized by the San Diego Bowl Game Association.

The 28th annual Pacific Life Holiday Bowl, which was played December 29 and featured the Oklahoma Sooners and Oregon Ducks, generated $33.8 million in economic impact. Direct visitor spending totaled $17.5 million, while $16.3 million was derived from indirect spending. The study revealed that 38,138 fans traveled from outside the County of San Diego to attend the game. Total attendance at the Qualcomm Stadium event was 65,416.

The inaugural San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl, which was played December 22 and featured the Navy Midshipmen and Colorado State Rams, generated an economic impact of $9.8 million. Direct visitor spending totaled $5.1 million, while $4.7 million was derived from indirect spending. According to the study, 16,578 fans traveled from outside the County of San Diego to attend the game. Total attendance was 36,842.

“Once again, the San Diego Bowl Game Association proved its importance to our community,” said 2005 president Stephen P. Cushman. “For 28 years now, the Holiday Bowl has played a significant economic role in the success of San Diego’s tourism industry. And with the addition of the Poinsettia Bowl and its pre-Christmas playing date, we are filling hotel rooms and providing patrons for restaurants and shops during the slowest week of the tourism year.”

The mission of the San Diego Bowl Game Association is to generate tourism, exposure, economic benefit and civic pride for San Diego and its citizens by presenting the nation’s most exciting and entertaining bowl games and festivals of events.

Since its inception in 1978, the San Diego Bowl Game Association has created an impact of $398 million.